Pixetera

Photography and art making as play.

Category: art

Monday, March 29, 2021

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Saturday, March 27, 2021: Homage to Walt Whitman (Part Two)

Walt Whitman died 129 years ago yesterday. My parents had a beautiful edition of Leaves of Grass that was published in 1940, but I never looked at it until last year. And then I was totally blown away by the poet’s profound embrace of all creation. I think I know why the book isn’t found in every house of worship but that’s where it really belongs.

In the images below, I’ve paired some of Lewis C. Daniel’s beautiful illustrations with images that I’ve posted on Pixetera over the years. It’s my small way of paying homage to St. Walt.

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Friday, March 26, 2021: Homage to Walt Whitman (Part One)

Walt Whitman died 129 years ago today. My parents had a beautiful edition of Leaves of Grass that was published in 1940, but I never looked at it until last year. And then I was totally blown away by the poet’s profound embrace of all creation. I think I know why the book isn’t found in every house of worship but that’s where it really belongs.

In the images below, I’ve paired some of Lewis C. Daniel’s beautiful illustrations with images that I’ve posted on Pixetera over the years. It’s my small way of paying homage to St. Walt.

(Click on images to enlarge.)

Saturday, February 6, 2021: “This Is Us, Regional Portraiture Today” at the Springfield Museums

Today was the phase two opening of the Springfield Museums’ This Is Us: Regional Portraiture Today exhibit being held in conjunction with the Smithsonian’s The Outwin 2019: American Portraiture Today that is also on display here in Springfield.

As regular visitors to Pixetera know, I’ve not been shy about having my own pop-up shows, courtesy of Photoshop, at other museums, e.g., MoMA, Dia:Beacon, Smith College Museum of Art — a surprisingly satisfying form of presenting work that makes up for its limited exposure with seriously reduced printing and framing costs :)

Happily though that wasn’t necessary for this regional show (not every artist lives within a 3-block radius of the museums as I do though). Below are two photographs from the exhibit, along with a new one made from discarded test prints.

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Sunday, October 11, 2020: BLM

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If Roses Were the Only Flower

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Just in case you missed the original announcement, here’s a plug for the book I published this summer. It’s a collection of poetry, both reverent and humorous, that I wrote on the subject of diversity, accompanied by images from Pixetera and my earlier career as a professional photographer. Its inspiration was the doctrine of signatures, an ancient belief system that saw evidence of a plant’s healing properties in its physical characteristics. With that as a starting point, the 11 poems and 43 photographs offer a whimsical antidote to the persistent racism that threatens our nation’s health and unity.

Books are available for purchase here. For more information, or if you’d like a personalized, autographed copy, please contact me directly.

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Sunday, September 20, 2020

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Friday, August 14, 2020

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Friday, August 7, 2020: If Roses Were the Only Flower

As longtime visitors know, I’ve dreamed of publishing a book of my photographs for many, many years. That fantasy fell away with the creation of my website, Alighting, a showcase for 730 images at last count, and a surprisingly satisfying alternative to print.

Fast-forward two years and a book with my photographs has now been published, rocketing to the top of the NY Times Best Seller list in only a few days—just kidding about the last part :) The seeds for If Roses Were the Only Flower were planted back in March or April when I began playing around with some modest poetry I thought would make an excellent children’s book about racial tolerance. I was hoping to find an artist who could do the illustrations until I realized that my photographs could serve that purpose just as well. By then, it was also apparent that my audience was adults. I’ll let the preface take it from here:

[My] inspiration was the doctrine of signatures, an ancient belief system I was introduced to many years ago, that examines the physical characteristics of a plant, e.g.,its shape, color, size, texture, etc., for clues about its healing properties in treating different ailments.

Although the doctrine of signatures has been largely discredited by the scientific community, its emphasis on the value of straightforward observation holds a certain appeal to me—perhaps because I’ve been a professional photographer for most of my life. This book, with poetry that is part Joyce Kilmer and part Dr. Seuss, and photos selected from my personal and commercial photographic work, grew out of the conviction that one can draw lessons about the human condition just by making note of the natural world around us. It focuses largely on one of Mother Nature’s most compelling attributes—the astonishing diversity she displays wherever we look.

As I hope you’ll discover in reading though, that’s not where the story ends.

If Roses Were the Only Flower is available for purchase here. You can also buy it directly from me in which case I’ll add a personal note. Payment however might be a bit more tricky so please email me at workwplayw@gmail.com if you want to go that route.

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Imagine a world where apples were the only kind of fruit:

We’d certainly have variety

To fill our fridge from A–Z,

And ask of Eve’s historic nosh

Was it Honeycrisp or McIntosh?

 

BUT

We’d have no watermelon seeds to spit,

Nor sundaes named banana split.

No orange marmalade on scones,

A treat to make us ditch our phones.

No cantaloupes that are so ripe,

Or berries that are worth their hype.

No dates or figs as good as candy,

Or pomegranates for the randy.

If Jello came in just one flavor,

I would not call that a favor.

 

Anyone new to self-publishing who would like to hear what my experience was like is also welcome to contact me to arrange a chat. In a nutshell, the creative part was great fun; getting the files ready for the printer though was a nightmare that needn’t have been. It got so bad at a certain point, in fact, that I lost all desire to do another book. That lasted about three days fortunately and I’m already at work on another much longer one where my photos will have the starring role, not just a supportive one.

Saturday, July 25, 2020

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Robert Markey, mosaic artist

The bright colors in this mosaic are reflections of a nearby wall mural. The artwork itself consists of mirrored pieces of glass: Thus, its appearance will vary throughout the day, depending as well on the angle from which it is viewed.

 

Pixetera

Photography and art making as play.