Pixetera

Photography and art making as play.

Category: history

Tuesday, January 28, 2020: Speaking of Old, Departed Cameras . . .

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Monday, May 27, 2019: Memorial Day

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Memorial Day is traditionally the day when Americans head for the malls to take advantage of holiday store sales honor their war dead, but maybe it’s time to set aside another day of remembrance—one that honors the victims of lynchings, mass shootings, extrajudicial police killings, and lethal criminal violence. These are the people who weren’t able to enjoy the freedom and security that our soldiers fought for and died to protect. Their shamefully high numbers are a stain on our nation’s conscience.

(A note on the image):

The picture is a composite of photographs that depict: (1) the 1930 Marion, Indiana lynchings of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith (Lawrence Beitler, photographer); (2) the 1882 lynching of an unidentified Afro-American man; (3) a memorial to the victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting (photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images); (4) an American flag.

From the first link:

“The iconic photograph of the incident inspired Abel Meeropol to write the poem and song “Strange Fruit,” which Billie Holliday recorded in 1939. 

Southern trees bear a strange fruit,
Blood on the leaves and blood at the root,
Black body swinging in the Southern breeze,
Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.

Pastoral scene of the gallant South,
The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth,
Scent of magnolia sweet and fresh,
And the sudden smell of burning flesh!

Here is a fruit for the crows to pluck,
For the rain to gather, for the wind to suck,
For the sun to rot, for a tree to drop,
Here is a strange and bitter crop.”

 

Another version, sung by Nina Simone with disturbing images of other lynchings.

 

 

Tuesday, April 23, 2019: Lyman Street File (Part Two)

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Friday, December 7, 2018

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Tuesday, December 4, 2018

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Thursday, November 15, 2018: Open Studios (Part Two: Stairwells)

The following images were taken at two open studio events in western Massachusetts this month: one at Eastworks in Easthampton, the other at Indian Orchard Mills in Springfield. The main attraction, of course, was the chance to see lots of art, talk with its creators, and check out their work spaces. Photography-wise though, what drew my attention was the old industrial mill buildings themselves, repurposed now to serve artists, craftsmen, and small businesses, but still showing signs of age in their details and public spaces. Yesterday, windows; today, stairwells. (Please click on images to enlarge.)

Wednesday, November 14, 2018: Open Studios (Part One: Windows)

The following images were taken at two open studio events in western Massachusetts this month: one at Eastworks in Easthampton, the other at Indian Orchard Mills in Springfield. The main attraction, of course, was the chance to see lots of art, talk with its creators, and check out their work spaces. Photography-wise though, what drew my attention was the old industrial mill buildings themselves, repurposed now to serve artists, craftsmen, and small businesses, but still showing signs of age in their details and public spaces. Today, windows; tomorrow, stairwells. (Please click on images to enlarge.)

 

 

Tuesday, August 28, 2018: Late Arrivals Department

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Wednesday, August 1, 2018

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Location links:

Classical High School History and Exteriors

Other illustrious alumni besides Theodor Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss who has an entire museum devoted to him across the street) are: Taj Mahal, William Manchester, and Timothy Leary. As far as I can tell, the Leary Museum keeps a very low profile.

The present atrium was created by removing the high school’s auditorium seating and floor, and exposing the lunchroom in the former basement. The grand staircase was added as part of the conversion to luxury apartments that began in 1986.

Saturday, April 21, 2018: Eacon Municipal Garage

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My thanks to David Benzing, husband of Linda Grashoff, for venturing to explain what process is on display in the third and fourth photos from the bottom. As David writes: “My best guess is road salt (likely died blue) has dissolved against the inside of the wood containment as moisture penetrated in from outside. The laminations visible correspond to growth rings in the wood, each of which—owing to the varying sizes of the water-conducting cells present in each ring—allowed the salt water to move across the planks unevenly from inside to outside. It looks like the patch of wood with salt crystals on it was either unusually permeable to moisture, or that surface was somehow exposed to more moisture than the surrounding areas.”

It’s hard to tell from the photos but some of the white and bluish areas were an inch or two thick in places with the consistency of a bar of soap.

 

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