Pixetera

Photography and art making as play.

Category: museums

Wednesday, February 12, 2020: Close-Up on Seuss

The photos below were taken during a drizzly afternoon at the Springfield Museum’s Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden. This enchanting public art installation, featuring Dr. Seuss’s most beloved characters, is the work of artist Lark Grey Dimond-Cates who is also Theodor Geisel’s step-daughter. Horton the Elephant, the subject of all but one close-up, was not harmed during the photography session. (Click on images to enlarge.)

 

Thursday, February 6, 2020: Museum of Antiquity

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Saturday, December 21, 2019: Border Crossing (Brattleboro, VT)

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Thursday, December 12, 2019: Elliot Erwitt and Me

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Elliott Erwitt is one of my favorite photographers so I was all too happy to catch the excellent show of his work that is currently on display at the D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts here in Springfield. The images above were inspired by another wonderful photographer, Peter of .Documenting.the.Obvious fame, and taken moments before a guard told me that photography was a no-no.

On my way out, I caught the placard below explaining Erwitt’s approach to museum photography. I left feeling that the master would have looked kindly on my transgression :)

Monday, November 18, 2019: The Fall Stalker (Act Three)

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Sunday, November 17, 2019: The Fall Stalker (Act Two)

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Friday, July 5, 2019

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If anyone knows the name of this plant, please let me know so I can properly identify it. First one with the correct answer gets free admission to Pixetera for the year, not to mention a garden full of thanks :)

Wednesday, May 29, 2019: Pixetera Pop-Up Show at Smith College Museum of Art

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Tuesday, May 28, 2019: Near Art Department

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Wednesday, November 21, 2018: The Paper City File

Holyoke, Massachusetts, which I visited briefly this week for the first time, was once known as The Paper City. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it produced approximately 80% of the paper used in this country and and was home to the largest paper, silk, and alpaca mills in the world. It is also the place where volleyball was invented and first played in 1895. (It’s early history makes for a really fun read.)

The images below were taken in the vicinity of the Holyoke Heritage State Park, which stands on the site of the Skinner Silk Mill that burned to the ground in 1980. The First Level Canal bordering one side of it was home to many other mills whose now vacant or underutilized structures can be seen in these photos.

I’d be very surprised if the city, now fallen on hard times, doesn’t make a huge comeback within the next decade.

(Btw, if you expect to find Mt. Holyoke College in Holyoke, you’ll be sadly disappointed. It’s located one town to the northeast in South Hadley, just across the Connecticut River.)

Please click on images to enlarge.

Pixetera

Photography and art making as play.